The Clintons, good or bad?

Jealousy – The dangers of success.

 

One of the reasons that Hillary Clinton is so disliked in America is because she and President Bill have reaped such rewards since Bill left the White House and Hillary became Secretary of State.

 

There have been many claims of skulduggery and fraud and even that the enormous Clinton Foundation only gives 6% of its wealth to charity. This is true when considering what the Clinton Foundation gives as cash to other charities, it is not true as the Foundation acts as a charity itself and disbursed 80%+ of its assets directly into charitable projects. There are other rumours that The Clinton foundation and the Secretary of State ‘fixed’ deals including the now infamous Kazakhstan Uranium One saga.

 

The most powerful force in American politics today is anti-establishment fury at a system rigged by a power elite that is anti-democractic.  You can see their reasoning. And yes there is little doubt that the two most famous people on the planet may have got ahead of themselves and made mistakes.  It seems inconceivable that in their situation, conjointly and individually, meeting world leaders on a daily basis they didn’t consciously or otherwise optimise those chances to enhance the Clinton Corporation. What is key in the argument here is whether the Clinton Corporation is really a force for good and that the Clintons themselves are drivers for doing good in the fields specified by the Clinton Foundation. Do they, Bill and Hillary, take cash off the top for their own good?  Does Bill get paid huge amounts to speak because he is who he is or because his wife was the Secretary of State?  Probably on both counts there more than a smidgeon of truth.

 

Many articles have been written emanating from ‘Clinton Cash’ that have cast a shadow over Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign. Clinton’s team and its allies have released multiple statements about the various issues detailed in book. It has been pointed out that the book’s author, Peter Schweizer, has worked with conservative groups and characterized the book as a partisan smear. A Clinton campaigner responded to the post that claimed Clinton played no part in the Uranium One deal and that the State Department was one of many agencies that approved it.

Below is a prospectus of the Clinton Foundation (2013), read it and see if the work done fits with these lofty ideals.  My own researches give me cause to give the Clintons my support, the Foundation has without doubt done more good that many other charitable foundations.  Yes there have been mistakes, but hey who hasn’t made mistakes?

Quote:

The Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation (the “Foundation”) builds partnerships of purpose to help people across the globe live their best life stories. We work with businesses, NGOs, governments, and individuals around the world to work faster, better, and leaner; to find solutions that last; and to transform lives and communities. In 2013, the Foundation expanded our work, reinforced our financial footing, and became better positioned to maximize our impact for years to come. Our tax statements reflect these improvements. To further our long-term impact, the Foundation began raising funds in 2013 for an endowment that will help us responsibly support established programs and expand our work. Financial commitments related to this endowment are reflected as increased revenue in these 990 documents. In addition, in 2013 the Foundation reconsolidated the Clinton Global Initiative into its operations. As such, the 990 tax document shows a corresponding increase in both revenue and expenses. The 990 document for the Clinton Health Access Initiative, a separate but affiliated initiative of the Foundation, is also included. We are proud of the impact that the Clinton Foundation has on millions of lives across the globe. In 2013:

  • The Clinton Climate Initiative expanded its home energy efficiency upgrade program, from one program in Arkansas to six programs across the nation;
  • The Clinton Development Initiative expanded programs in Malawi, Tanzania, and Rwanda that help more than 25,000 farmers generate greater harvests and more stable income;
  • The Clinton Giustra Enterprise Partnership opened new supply and training center enterprises in Colombia and a new distribution venture in Peru;
  • The Clinton Global Initiative brought together CGI members, who made more than 300 independent commitments in 2013 that, when fully funded and implemented, will impact the lives of more than 22 million people;
  • The Clinton Health Matters Initiative expanded community health and wellness programs in four communities in the United States, and helped facilitate $100 million in strategic partnerships that touch the lives of more than 25 million across the country;
  • The Clinton Presidential Center hosted symposia and exhibits, on topics such as the Northern Ireland peace process, and marked over three million visitors to the Little Rock Center since 2004.
  • Volunteers participated in five Day of Action events across the globe, including in St. Louis, New York City, Rio de Janeiro, and Chicago.
  • The Alliance for a Healthier Generation, an affiliated initiative supported by the Foundation, added more than 5,000 schools to the Healthy Schools Program that serves more than 12.2 million children with healthier food;
  • The Clinton Health Access Initiative, an affiliated initiative supported by the Foundation, expanded access to more affordable HIV/AIDS medicine to cover 6.8 million people in over 70 countries, while reducing prices for medicine and vaccines; In addition, Secretary Clinton launched two initiatives in 2013, expanding the Foundation’s work in early childhood and women’s and girls’ participation. Too Small to Fail is focused on providing parents with the tools and information they need to close the word gap and give their kids the best start in school and in life. No Ceilings:

The Full Participation Project, led by Secretary Clinton and Chelsea Clinton, aims to advance and inspire the full participation of women and girls around the world. We are incredibly proud of our work helping people live their best life stories. With an even stronger year ahead the Foundation is well placed to further its charitable aims.

Unquote.

 

As for the other Presidential candidate, I don’t think charity is his thing!

Now the battle begins

The US primaries are over, and the contrasts between the two parties could not have been starker.

 

Trump believes he alone can fix America from the ills he see in every corner, from Mexican immigrants to terrorising Muslims and Chinese creditors. The whole of the Republican case for change is base

The US primaries are over, and the contrasts between the two parties could not have been starker.

 

Trump believes he alone can fix America from the ills he see in every corner, from Mexican immigrants to terrorising Muslims and Chinese creditors. The whole of the Republican case for change is based on fear and blame.  Fear of a dangerous world , which is rational enough, but Trump’s wildly varying messages of isolationism on the one hand and I’ll blast ISIS on the other smacks of a man who has little if any grasp of the complexity of foreign affairs.

 

Clinton and the Democrats looked and sounded more optimistic, more inclusive, and more savvy.  Despite the hullaballoo of the Democratic Party tampering with support for the primary candidates and the revelation that Secretary of State Clinton had taken some short cuts, the battery of the great and the good managed to push Mrs Clinton’s cause to unassailable heights.  She now seems unstoppable, or at least I hope she’s unstoppable.

 

I often ask myself what is it with American politics that makes it so vicious?  Even Saunders supporters seem hell bent on doing Hillary Clinton down because of the faux pas of the party machinery.  Yes someone may have been meddling where they should not, but that doesn’t negate the validity of Clinton’s candidacy.  Likewise the hoo-ha about the e-mails that were sent from her private server when she was Secretary of state, as the FBI guy said it was a mistake and a poor judgement call but in the great scheme of things it was a very busy lady making a small error with no real risk attached.

 

Take Trump University now there’s a crook deal if ever there was one – no one seems to mind that Trump lent his name to such a bogus and fraudulent enterprise.

 

The problem that continues to haunt Mrs Clinton is that she has given her life to her ambition and whilst she has been an undoubted servant of the American cause she has also been continuously in the public eye, she is now a very wealthy woman, she’s done well from her labours which most folk distrust from politicians, and frankly many folk have ‘Clinton fatigue’.

 

No one or thing is perfect when it comes to politics, especially democratic politics.  There’s a lot that could be better, a Joan of Arc figure fighting a messianic genius, but it’s not going to happen.  Hillary has her faults and has made her mistakes, she’s not perfect but she’s a survivor and a fighter who has always been a committed democrat. She’s bright and experienced and she values the ideals of a democratic society.  That’s not bad, in fact despite all the prejudice it’s pretty good.

 

As for Trump, don’t be afraid America, don’t listen to what’s wrong and the mean ways of putting it right. Be bold and vote for the promise of the future and vote for each other, in your great democratic land.

 

 

The US primaries are over, and the contrasts between the two parties could not have been starker.

 

Trump believes he alone can fix America from the ills he see in every corner, from Mexican immigrants to terrorising Muslims and Chinese creditors. The whole of the Republican case for change is based on fear and blame.  Fear of a dangerous world , which is rational enough, but Trump’s wildly varying messages of isolationism on the one hand and I’ll blast ISIS on the other smacks of a man who has little if any grasp of the complexity of foreign affairs.

 

Clinton and the Democrats looked and sounded more optimistic, more inclusive, and more savvy.  Despite the hullaballoo of the Democratic Party tampering with support for the primary candidates and the revelation that Secretary of State Clinton had taken some short cuts, the battery of the great and the good managed to push Mrs Clinton’s cause to unassailable heights.  She now seems unstoppable, or at least I hope she’s unstoppable.

 

I often ask myself what is it with American politics that makes it so vicious?  Even Saunders supporters seem hell bent on doing Hillary Clinton down because of the faux pas of the party machinery.  Yes someone may have been meddling where they should not, but that doesn’t negate the validity of Clinton’s candidacy.  Likewise the hoo-ha about the e-mails that were sent from her private server when she was Secretary of state, as the FBI guy said it was a mistake and a poor judgement call but in the great scheme of things it was a very busy lady making a small error with no real risk attached.

 

Take Trump University now there’s a crook deal if ever there was one – no one seems to mind that Trump lent his name to such a bogus and fraudulent enterprise.

 

The problem that continues to haunt Mrs Clinton is that she has given her life to her ambition and whilst she has been an undoubted servant of the American cause she has also been continuously in the public eye, she is now a very wealthy woman, she’s done well from her labours which most folk distrust from politicians, and frankly many folk have ‘Clinton fatigue’.

 

No one or thing is perfect when it comes to politics, especially democratic politics.  There’s a lot that could be better, a Joan of Arc figure fighting a messianic genius, but it’s not going to happen.  Hillary has her faults and has made her mistakes, she’s not perfect but she’s a survivor and a fighter who has always been a committed democrat. She’s bright and experienced and she values the ideals of a democratic society.  That’s not bad, in fact despite all the prejudice it’s pretty good.

 

As for Trump, don’t be afraid America, don’t listen to what’s wrong and the mean ways of putting it right. Be bold and vote for the promise of the future and vote for each other, in your great democratic land.

 

 

The US primaries are over, and the contrasts between the two parties could not have been starker.

 

Trump believes he alone can fix America from the ills he see in every corner, from Mexican immigrants to terrorising Muslims and Chinese creditors. The whole of the Republican case for change is based on fear and blame.  Fear of a dangerous world , which is rational enough, but Trump’s wildly varying messages of isolationism on the one hand and I’ll blast ISIS on the other smacks of a man who has little if any grasp of the complexity of foreign affairs.

 

Clinton and the Democrats looked and sounded more optimistic, more inclusive, and more savvy.  Despite the hullaballoo of the Democratic Party tampering with support for the primary candidates and the revelation that Secretary of State Clinton had taken some short cuts, the battery of the great and the good managed to push Mrs Clinton’s cause to unassailable heights.  She now seems unstoppable, or at least I hope she’s unstoppable.

 

I often ask myself what is it with American politics that makes it so vicious?  Even Saunders supporters seem hell bent on doing Hillary Clinton down because of the faux pas of the party machinery.  Yes someone may have been meddling where they should not, but that doesn’t negate the validity of Clinton’s candidacy.  Likewise the hoo-ha about the e-mails that were sent from her private server when she was Secretary of state, as the FBI guy said it was a mistake and a poor judgement call but in the great scheme of things it was a very busy lady making a small error with no real risk attached.

 

Take Trump University now there’s a crook deal if ever there was one – no one seems to mind that Trump lent his name to such a bogus and fraudulent enterprise.

 

The problem that continues to haunt Mrs Clinton is that she has given her life to her ambition and whilst she has been an undoubted servant of the American cause she has also been continuously in the public eye, she is now a very wealthy woman, she’s done well from her labours which most folk distrust from politicians, and frankly many folk have ‘Clinton fatigue’.

 

No one or thing is perfect when it comes to politics, especially democratic politics.  There’s a lot that could be better, a Joan of Arc figure fighting a messianic genius, but it’s not going to happen.  Hillary has her faults and has made her mistakes, she’s not perfect but she’s a survivor and a fighter who has always been a committed democrat. She’s bright and experienced and she values the ideals of a democratic society.  That’s not bad, in fact despite all the prejudice it’s pretty good.

 

As for Trump, don’t be afraid America, don’t listen to what’s wrong and the mean ways of putting it right. Be bold and vote for the promise of the future and vote for each other, in your great democratic land.

 

 

d on fear and blame.  Fear of a dangerous world , which is rational enough, but Trump’s wildly varying messages of isolationism on the one hand and I’ll blast ISIS on the other smacks of a man who has little if any grasp of the complexity of foreign affairs.

 

Clinton and the Democrats looked and sounded more optimistic, more inclusive, and more savvy.  Despite the hullaballoo of the Democratic Party tampering with support for the primary candidates and the revelation that Secretary of State Clinton had taken some short cuts, the battery of the great and the good managed to push Mrs Clinton’s cause to unassailable heights.  She now seems unstoppable, or at least I hope she’s unstoppable.

 

I often ask myself what is it with American politics that makes it so vicious?  Even Saunders supporters seem hell bent on doing Hillary Clinton down because of the faux pas of the party machinery.  Yes someone may have been meddling where they should not, but that doesn’t negate the validity of Clinton’s candidacy.  Likewise the hoo-ha about the e-mails that were sent from her private server when she was Secretary of state, as the FBI guy said it was a mistake and a poor judgement call but in the great scheme of things it was a very busy lady making a small error with no real risk attached.

 

Take Trump University now there’s a crook deal if ever there was one – no one seems to mind that Trump lent his name to such a bogus and fraudulent enterprise.

 

The problem that continues to haunt Mrs Clinton is that she has given her life to her ambition and whilst she has been an undoubted servant of the American cause she has also been continuously in the public eye, she is now a very wealthy woman, she’s done well from her labours which most folk distrust from politicians, and frankly many folk have ‘Clinton fatigue’.

 

No one or thing is perfect when it comes to politics, especially democratic politics.  There’s a lot that could be better, a Joan of Arc figure fighting a messianic genius, but it’s not going to happen.  Hillary has her faults and has made her mistakes, she’s not perfect but she’s a survivor and a fighter who has always been a committed democrat. She’s bright and experienced and she values the ideals of a democratic society.  That’s not bad, in fact despite all the prejudice it’s pretty good.

 

As for Trump, don’t be afraid America, don’t listen to what’s wrong and the mean ways of putting it right. Be bold and vote for the promise of the future and vote for each other, in your great democratic land.

 

 

An unconventional Convention!

It is easy to sneer at the things we don’t hold acceptable, and it is hard sometimes to stop the sneering at people who have the opposite view. I’m finding it hard not to, as the Republican Convention rolls on in Cleveland.

 

For centre ground democrats whether American, or any other nationality for that matter, the prospect of a Trump victory in the U.S. elections is unthinkable.  His rhetoric screams intolerance and bigotry yet he seems to strike a chord with millions of Americans. Question! Are all these Republicans equally intolerant and prejudiced as Trump? If so why? Is America building a society where bigotry and prejudice are becoming core values? Is selfishness and greed amongst the core values of the United States?

 

It seems that many ordinary Americans admire the brash billionaire for his no nonsense politically incorrect plain speaking.  ‘He speaks for us’. They say, but once more in the great tussle for the hearts and minds of the mass voters there is little understanding of what the message really is.  The assertions that Trump will build walls, exclude Muslims, annihilate ISIS, are viciously overstated, undeliverable so called pledges, which anyone with half a brain should not countenance, yet and yet, — many follow Trump.

 

I include below a brilliant piece from the Washington Post by Michael Gerson which expresses much better than ever I could the dangers of Trump and his followers

CLEVELAND — The notions that Donald Trump would make a typical presidential pivot, or that his divisive form of politics was merely a pose, lie dead on the convention floor in Cleveland. And it is now necessary to confront his unmasked contempt for American institutions.

Far from being confused or opportunistic, Trump has a consistent, well-developed view of the universe and his (prominent) place within it. The world is in chaos. Our country is being infiltrated by child-murdering illegal immigrants and a “massive flow” of disloyal, unscreened refugees. American communities are overwhelmed by violence, impoverished by unfair trade and betrayed by politicians who refuse to “put America first.” The institutions that are supposed to defend us are dominated by special interests and rigged by elites.

These claims are wrong, exaggerated or cherry-picked in nearly every respect. But the message resonates. A majority of Americans regard their country as being on the “wrong track,” and has for some time. Conservative media and “breaking news”-driven cable networks reinforce this sense of decline and crisis.

And our institutional challenges are not imaginary: A long-term, wage-earner recession (to which Republicans have offered little practical response). Educational mediocrity concentrated in high-poverty communities. Congressional dysfunction. A Supreme Court that seems overly political and outcome driven. Everyone can find some reason for disillusionment.

But there are two possible responses to such failures. The first is the institutionalist answer: To rebuild with existing materials. To reform, repair, reclaim and renew our patrimony. The second alternative is the promise of deliverance by a man on horseback — a single leader claiming to embody the interests of “the people.”

In Cleveland, Trump offered the second option with more forthright clarity than any politician in my lifetime. The speech contained almost no serious discussion of public policy or ideological argumentation. Instead, Trump said: “I am your voice.”  “I am not able to look the other way.” “I know the time for action has come.” “I will be your champion.” “I will fight for you, and I will win for you.”

As someone involved in GOP politics during a previous professional life, the moment was surreal, then emotional. A party with a distinguished history, generally led by men and women of public spirit and decency, has embraced a demagogue who may be a genuine threat to American democracy. Trump is cultivating a state of panic to increase public tolerance for political risk — in this case, the risk of a candidate who is untested, unprepared, unstable and unfit. And the requisite sense of emergency is being created by populating American nightmares with migrants, refugees and Muslims. Standing on the convention floor, I could see what the face of American authoritarianism might look like.

If Trump is elected president, he can justly claim a mandate to pursue the enemies of the people, foreign and domestic. If he tests the limits of executive power to punish rivals and intimidate opponents, he has hidden none of his intentions.

The Caesarian option — rolling the dice with a populist authoritarian, using democratic majorities to undermine democratic structures — is common in history. Any Latin American or African can tell you what strongmen or “big men” are like.

But Trump’s version of “Americanism” is not, in fact, very American. Our constitutional system was designed to make personal rule both impossible and unnecessary. The idea that political salvation might be found simply by replacing one leader at the top of government would have been regarded as perverse by the Founders. America has benefited from skilled leaders — a Lincoln or an FDR — at moments of genuine national crisis. But this is not such a time. And this is not such a leader.

Does institutionalism still have defenders in American public life? Certainly there are members of the Senate and House who would resist and balance the ambitions of a President Trump. But history has often shown that unscrupulous executive power can run circles around a divided legislature.

It is also hard for me to regard Hillary Clinton — whatever her other virtues — as the savior of institutional integrity. While she would be preferable, on this score, to Trump, she has her own history of disregard for the rules and procedures that govern other mortals.

However quixotic the attempt may currently seem, America needs a committed institutionalist in the presidential race. Those distinguished Americans who have taken a pass on running as a third-party candidate should watch Trump’s Cleveland speech once again, and weigh the very real risk to the republic. Bob Gates, are you taking phone calls?

(c) 2016, Washington Post Writers Group

I acknowledge the above copyright of the Washington Post Group*

 

 

Democracy, democracy! What a lark?

Democracy, democracy, what a lark?

 

In the UK The Labour party, still the champion of the left, is tearing itself apart because of a democratic idea that one man one vote should determine who leads the parliamentary labour party. This might have sounded a good idea at the time.

 

However there is a contrary view which argues that the members of parliament are elected by millions of voters and it is those elected individuals who should choose their parliamentary party leader.

 

Most MP’s at least when they are first elected do so because of their ability to persuade the electorate that they are the best person to represent their views. Those elected MP’s represent not only those who voted for them but all their constituents irrespective of their party loyalties.

 

The UK electorate is by and large middle of the road with the classic divide of rural and urbanised classes.  Labour rule the industrial heart lands and the Tories the Shires and the services economic centres. There is a great cultural divide that effects the fringes of society, so as society moves from an industrial one to a knowledge based one, then there is a very slow shift from the left and right toward the centre ground.  Today the great mass of the electorate straddle the middle ground the centre left and centre right.

 

A small minority are marooned extreme left and extreme right.  They are very noisy from the UKIP right to the Momentum left.  These people are influencers, as shown by the great Brexit fiasco where another democratic experiment went seriously wrong for the governing party of the day.

 

It is now Momentum and extreme left affiliates who are dominating the struggle to keep Corbyn as leader of the labour party simply because these ‘extremists’ are motivated to buy a membership and buy the chance to vote.

 

Anyone with common sense must understand that neither extreme right nor extreme left will win British hearts and minds in a general election. If Corbyn is elected again and fails to gain the support of the parliamentary Labour party, then that will condemn Labour as we know it today into perpetual opposition.  Such a move will also effectively disenfranchise the ordinary labour voter.  Such a schism will almost certainly see the labour movement split into a Social Democratic party of the centre left and Marxist labour party of the extreme left.

 

The difference between the two, the moderate and the extreme is that the moderate understands the need to incentivise as well as to support. They see a dynamic society where aspiration and innovation has a place. The extreme left focus on social needs with an accent on the underprivileged, a focus on egalitarianism, social uniformity, and big government in everything from nationalisation to comprehensive education.

 

No one is saying that the sentiments of the far left are wrong, caring for each other in any context has to be right.  However many see the overbearing nanny state as something to avoid, and anyway hard left socialism doesn’t work. ( see: East Germany, Poland, etc)

 

In the USA, democracy has thrown up Donald Trump, I use the words advisedly.  Let’s hope democracy on both sides of the pond and from opposite spectrums, does not yield results that nobody wants

The World is dangerous Place.

We mourn for the weeping people of France and abhor the despicable crimes of Nice and Paris.

Democracy it seems is not for everyone. The greatest threat to democracy is not violence but ignorance.

This assertion is in itself a difficult premise. For many who abhor the West and its self-satisfied democratic credo, see faith as superior to democracy. The snag is that many faiths deliver many tenets, from jihad to passivism. We teeter toward an ever more dangerous set of circumstances where violence and hate seem to be the common drivers. The Turkish coup has made even more perilous, the plight of the Turkish people and the already tinder like situation on the borders between Europe and the Middle East.

President Erdogan will undoubtedly use the failed coup as an excuse for crackdowns on the judiciary, freedom of the press and the idea of a secular government. It seems, if only superficially, that the majority of ordinary Turkish people agree with him and will happily allow him to govern as he pleases. Executions and persecution of the free press will become a daily occurrence in what was seen as a fledgling democracy. Turkey is a NATO member. For how much longer I wonder?

The USA the great bastion of Western democracy is descending into a violent race driven conflict which if allowed to rage unchecked will give fuel to an accelerated descent into mayhem. Donald Trump for President. Maybe? Surely not, but I wouldn’t bet against it happening.

The European scene is hardly brighter with most of the Brexit voters having no idea what they voted for. Or indeed in many cases what they voted against. Here is a single and outstanding failure of the democratic ideal. A large number of ignorant people voting for something they don’t understand and the Government of the day supporting the vote because ‘the people have spoken!’ At least they were allowed to speak, and they were allowed to speak without someone pointing a gun at them. They were allowed to speak even if they disagreed with their neighbour. They were allowed to speak even if they were ignorant.

They were allowed to speak because they have an unspoken faith in democracy, the freedom to say what they like, when they like, and to whom they like. (Incitement to hatred excepted.)

Now, if my faith is in a person who reinforces my religious beliefs then is democracy wrong? If I choose to follow him. Am I not allowed to follow my prophet who guided my forefathers? Even if I am ignorant of wider issues like my Brexit friends. Is this not democracy? These arguments lead us to hesitate before jumping to the conclusion of what is right and what is wrong.

However those who read this blog can give thanks that they have the unfettered right to do so.

Sad America.

Great pity to see USA being sucked into greater but sad establishment (police) racism. Guns seem to be embedded in the American psyche as a universal crutch, creating a nation of aggressive cripples. God bless America, I don’t think so!
No place for hate there or anywhere else.
How many have to die before the nation wakes up? Apparently, no one cares, just pop out and buy a machine gun – that should keep you safe!
Is the world crazy or just America?

Stymied! No government, opposition or plan

Stymied! No government, no opposition, no plan.

It’s hard to believe that Cameron’s government have blundered into the referendum without planning for either possible eventuality. Beyond belief!

Now Cameron has walked away because he lost what he thought was a certain win and left the country in the lurch with no leadership at all. Very disappointing and indeed immature. How could he be so naïve? Whatever good he did as Prime Minister will now be forever lost as he will be remembered as the chancer who lost.

Brexit is now a fact and as I prophesied in my earlier blog, Nicola Sturgeon is on the rampage, the conservatives set for a contest between two untried ladies neither of whom has much experience outside their existing portfolios. Fortunately, for the Conservatives, the opposition is unelectable with Jeremy Corbyn and the left wing loonies unshakable in their delusion. The Liberal democrats hardly worthy of mention.

What the Europeans must think does not bear contemplation. We even have a foreign Secretary who felt that planning for an exit was not worth entertaining. Pathetic!

Cameron has a lot to answer for, not Brexit but his absolutely cowardly withdrawal as if all this was nothing to do with him. Who sponsored the referendum for heaven’s sake? His walking away and leaving a vacuum at this most crucial time is a shocking misjudgement which has really let the UK down.

Whoever wins the keys to Number 10 will inherit an unnecessarily weakened economy and the prospect of a General Election which will give rise to even more uncertainty.

Yes, we anticipated some short term problems on foreign exchange and unsettling arguments about future relationships, but we did not expect our leaders to fall apart and leave the country rudderless. Shame on them. The centre of British politics is now inevitably lurching right which aids and abets the extremes of racial conflict. Shame on us all.

Where is the collective good will and generosity of spirit that should frame the way forward with an optimistic drive for innovation and leadership? Where indeed? Thrown out with the bath water, let’s hope the new leader whoever it turns out to be , has the courage to pick up the ball and run it back to where Britain belongs – in the lead.